Up until now, most of the footage I’ve gathered of the Paris Landing Renovation Project had been collected early in the morning, before the call of the first rooster.  It’s peaceful at that hour and auspiciously lacks the presence of hard-hatted workers running their heavy machinery.  Usually my only encounter at this hour is with the random ‘off course’ feathered fowl, and my guess is, he could care less about the footage I was trying to gather.

Ah, the smell of fresh morning air at the Paris Landing Inn and Suites

I have to admit though, the lack of excavator exhaust early in the morning at the build site, has become substantial motivation for prying my head off the BioPEDIC pillow which usually cushions my cranium for 8 of every 24 hours.  Not to mention; sunrise footage of most anything, is the time when photography pays you back!

It was a Saturday night and my ladies were cemented to their ‘devices’ at home, and since I don’t sit ideally very well, I thought it was an opportune time to get some sunset footage of the Paris Landing Inn Renovation Project.  So, I gathered up my equipment and told my ladies, I’d be back shortly.  Though, I’m not sure my message resonated with them, due to their lack of movement or vocal confirmation, but I was out the door nevertheless.

A race against the setting sun

The drive down to the build site was a race against time as the sun was descending with every mile passed.  The closer I got the more majestic the sky became, as anticipation grew in my belly.  I wanted to time it perfectly, to position the Mavic facing West at just the perfect time to capture that elusive view of the sun’s trailing edge.

Upon arrival at grounds of the Paris Landing Inn, I hustled to launch the DJI Go app, and calibrate the Mavic, with the hopes of an uninterrupted flight.  It was going to be quick because I was running out of daylight.  I set the Mavic on the ground after calibration, ready for launch when out of the corner of my eye flashes the Parks and Recreation vehicle as it slowly creeps by.

I held off the launch, anticipating the vehicle might circle back to get a closer look at what I was up to.  My calculation was correct, and it was a good thing I held the launch.

Abort the launch

Up creeps the security officer, “Brandon, how’re you doing”, I asked?  We talked about life for a bit and then he drops the bomb!  “Do you have a license for that drone”?  “Unfortunately not”, I said.  “I really cannot let you fly it here, there have been too many perverts flying them over the top of the swimming pool and the beach”.

I told him about my video, and how I was trying to choreograph the entire Paris Landing Inn renovation project, but it fell on deaf ears.  I asked, “if I have a license would that help”?  “Yes”  he said.  But, just to be sure, he would run it by his boss.

Time to get my FAA Part 107

As I drove home admiring the composition of the sky above, it was then I decided it was time to take the preparation course I had been thinking about, to help me pass the FAA Part 107 exam.  In order to become a commercial UAV pilot, the Part 107 is now a requirement.

In fact, I see a future where the only way to be able to fly any drone higher than a single-story rooftop, will be to possess the Part 107 license.

Online Class through Dronelaunchacademy.com

So, after careful consideration and significant research, I’ve enrolled in the dronelaunchacademy.com’s online preparation class, and will soon be able to return to the skies over the Paris Landing Inn Renovation.  Hopefully, that beautiful sunset will be waiting for me on my next flight over Paris Landing, this time armed with my Part 107.

For more detailed information on Part 107 check out this great post by Joseph Flynt at 3dinsider.com, or if this still leaves some unanswered questions, check out uavcoach.com’s drone certification post.

Thankfully, the night wasn’t a total photography dud, I was able to get the picture seen above of the magnificent sky, on my way back home.