The Winter of 2018-19 in West Tennessee will be remembered for one thing, staggering amounts of debilitating, rain!  Floods of epic proportions, have guaranteed our lakes and ponds will have enough water to make it through two summer droughts.  I’m sure we will be grateful for the amount of rainfall we’ve had once late August hits, but for now, we struggle to find a place for all this water.

Complaining aside; this morning was picture perfect at the Paris Landing Inn and Suites demolition project.  It’s late February, temperatures were in the mid-40s, and not a drop of rain was in the forecast.  This view of the serene lake with the sunrise-to-rival-all-others as its backdrop, was my compensation for getting out of bed early this morning.

I had to launch my Mavic Air from the southwestern side of the Paris Landing Inn, due to the Southeastern side being in-accessible to anything but a boat.  It was a blessing in disguise.  Not only was it a great perspective to see the sun breach the horizon, but because the water was warmer than the air, it appeared frothy, much like my Starbucks favorite, the Carmel Macchiado.

It was a race against the clock to get the drone airborne before the sun rose.  I had to catch the sun rising over the last remaining skeleton-of-a-building at the Paris Landing Inn demolition site.  I struggled to ready the Mavic Air for take-off as the sparse light challenged my every move.  The eerie silence was constantly interrupted by the casual splashing of fish fins penetrating the water’s surface.

Finally, I was airborne.  The wind was puffing at a paltry, 5 knots, which is ideal for camera stability and for conserving the battery life in the Mavic Air.  I was in position, facing east, above the last visible structure of the original Paris Landing Inn.  Click, I managed to capture this shot at about 06:38 with the ISO set at 100, the aperture at F/2.8 at 4.5 mm and the shutter speed at 1/240 of a second.

My objective was accomplished, I wanted to capture the last remaining structure of the Paris Landing Inn before it’s memoir is published, and the original structure becomes a fleeting memory.  The original design, though simplistic, was well built and able to withstand, all that Mother Nature could muster at it, for many years.   It will be interesting to see if the new design will possess the same fortitude as the original structure.  For now, the journey of capturing the progression from Outdated Hotel to Outstanding Chalet shall continue.